Social Philosophy

Course Description:

This course seeks to understand as well as answer a number of central questions in Philosophy through the writings of contemporary and major Western philosophers as well as through the close study of several fundamental issues that have risen in the course of the development of the Western philosophical tradition, such as free will, our knowledge of the "external" world, our society, socio-political development, and the meaning and value of truth and justice. This course is more about thinking and thinking things through than it is about coverage or the memorization of a bunch of facts. Additionally, it is designed to be an introduction and its problems and as such it is not intended to be comprehensive or exhaustive. The materials are selected to provide a basis for understanding central debates within the field. At most, the course seeks to introduce students to some of the greatest thinkers throughout history in social philosophy and develop their ability to communicate knowledge and ideas to others, as well as apply these ideas in a contemporary context. Philosophers such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Mill, Marx, and King will be studied.

Teacher: Mark McDonald

Introduction to Psychology

This course is intended to expose students to the field of psychology. The material addresses the basic principles, concepts and an overview of the field of psychology. It emphasizes in developing an appreciation for psychology as the science of cognition and human behavior. It identifies major exponents and provides a general understanding of the affective, behavioral and cognitive processes of human behavior. Relevant topics discuss include consciousness, health and stress, perception, brain and behavior, psychological disorders, personality theories, human development, and social influence. It also explores the application of psychological principles and concepts to business, social and personal life.

Teacher: Mark McDonald