Environmental Conservation & Development Section 2

Environmental Conservation and Development is a course designed for Natural Resources Management majors pursuing an Associate degree in Natural Resources Management. This course introduces students to ecological terms and concepts such as species, population, ecology, community, ecosystem; the structure of ecosystems including biotic e.g. producers, consumers, detritivores, and decomposers and abiotic factors e.g. water, temperature, pH, soil factors; community ecology such as the different types of feeding relationships, food webs and non-feeding relationships (symbiosis); ecosystem stability and diversity; population ecology including population explosion, population crash; human interactions with natural ecosystems e.g. pollution, global warming, climate change; the hydrologic cycle and its problems; the soil, soil degradation and conservation; energy from fossil fuels and nuclear power; pest and pest control; waste water treatment; hunger and malnutrition; climate change and global warming; pollution and prevention; and, biodiversity and wild species. 

Impact Assessment

Environmental Assessment is a course designed for Natural Resources Management majors pursuing an Associate’s degree in Natural Resources Management. This course introduces students to the different types survey methods including aquatic surveys, fauna surveys, terrestrial surveys, marine surveys, and vegetation and plant species surveys.  Environmental Assessment encompasses the history and use of Rapid Ecological Assessments by outlining the process and looking at the need for these types of assessments.  This course also looks at the use of GIS and its advantages including remote sensing, aerial photography and GPS. Methods used to assess stress will be discussed as well as reduction strategies and plans in writing a REA report.

Protected Areas Management

Protected Areas Management is a course designed for Natural Resources Management (NRM) majors pursuing an Associate’s degree in NRM. This course introduces students to the different types of resources including those in freshwater, marine and terrestrial areas. Natural and anthropogenic impacts to these resources will be highlighted in this course and management techniques will be identified.  In order to understand how protected areas are managed, students will be exposed to the different legislation concerning protected areas in Belize.  System and site planning will also be outlined in the course and is the core of the course.  Different management strategies and problems associated with protected areas will be summarized.

Terrestrial Management Issues

Terrestrial Management Issues is a course designed for Natural Resources Management (NRM) majors pursuing an Associate’s degree in NRM. This course introduces students to the different types of human activities that threaten terrestrial resources such as hunting, mining, urbanization, road construction, tourism and so on.  Students will be exposed to terrestrial and systems ecology as well as nutrient flow and energy cycle in those systems.  Homeostasis, evolution and the Gaia concept will be highlighted to show a trend in terrestrial ecosystems.  Soil ecology is also an important topic discussed in this course and includes soil macro- and micro-fauna and their roles in the soil.  The different types of terrestrial ecosystems will also be studied in this course such as moist and wet forests, dry tropical forests and Mountain Pine Ridge. 

Environmental Conservation and Development Section 1

This course introduces students to environmental conservation and development by reviewing the biophysical and socioeconomic dimensions of environmental problems to develop more effective conservation and development solutions. Key ecological terms and concepts such as species, population, ecology, community, ecosystem; the structure of ecosystems, community ecology, food webs and non-feeding relationships (symbiosis); ecosystem stability and diversity are explored. Understanding of the major approaches to conservation and development and their relative strengths and weakness are examined and analyzed.